8 femmes

8femmes.jpg

After a long workday, two friends and I ended up renting this French film from 2002, which stars an amazing array of French female talent from several generations (Danielle Darrieux, Catherine Deneuve, Fanny Ardant, Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Béart and others), an Agatha Christiesque plot with some incredible twists and contortions and, best of all, song and dance numbers by the stars that make you laugh or cry.

The final song, sung by Danielle Darrieux, is one of my favorite poems, Il n’y a pas d’amour heureux, by Louis Aragon, set to music by Georges Brassens.

Mon bel amour mon cher amour ma déchirure
Je te porte dans moi comme un oiseau blessé

(from the poem by Aragon)

Advertisements

About James Steerforth

I am an author of poetry and fiction, translator and painter who loves to have fun with borrowed feathers.
This entry was posted in Bland observations, Cinema, Film, Life, Literature, Movies, Music, Poetry, Stellar poetry. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to 8 femmes

  1. Prashmat says:

    Hi,
    I love this film. A beautiful plot and lovely songs as you mentioned in your post. ‘Mon bel amour mon cher amour’ is one of my favourites too. I like ‘Pour ne par vivre seule on vit avec un chien….’ sung by Firmine Richard and written by D. Faure. To be honest i love all the songs in this film. The composition of the music, the poetry everything is fabulous.

    Well have a nice day !

    Prash

  2. Thanks for your comment.

    One scene that continues to stick in my mind is of Deneuve and Ardant fighting, then kissing, then trying to pretend nothing has happened when everybody else comes in. Hilarious.

  3. Prashmat says:

    Yes that’s a lovely scene and quite hilarious. hehehe. I even liked deneuve’s and ardant’s songs.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s