Ending 16 – from a Russian novel published in 1873-1877

vivienl.jpg

Vivien Leigh in the 1947 film based on this novel

“Oh, you haven’t gone in then?” he heard Kitty’s voice all at once, as she came by the same way to the drawing-room.

“What is it? you’re not worried about anything?” she said, looking intently at his face in the starlight.

But she could not have seen his face if a flash of lightning had not hidden the stars and revealed it. In that flash she saw his face distinctly, and seeing him calm and happy, she smiled at him.

“She understands,” he thought; “she knows what I’m thinking about. Shall I tell her or not? Yes, I’ll tell her.” But at the moment he was about to speak, she began speaking.

“Kostya! do something for me,” she said; “go into the corner room and see if they’ve made it all right for Sergey Ivanovitch. I can’t very well. See if they’ve put the new wash stand in it.”

“Very well, I’ll go directly,” said Levin, standing up and kissing her.

“No, I’d better not speak of it,” he thought, when she had gone in before him. “It is a secret for me alone, of vital importance for me, and not to be put into words.

“This new feeling has not changed me, has not made me happy and enlightened all of a sudden, as I had dreamed, just like the feeling for my child. There was no surprise in this either. Faith–or not faith–I don’t know what it is–but this feeling has come just as imperceptibly through suffering, and has taken firm root in my soul.

“I shall go on in the same way, losing my temper with Ivan the coachman, falling into angry discussions, expressing my opinions tactlessly; there will be still the same wall between the holy of holies of my soul and other people, even my wife; I shall still go on scolding her for my own terror, and being remorseful for it; I shall still be as unable to understand with my reason why I pray, and I shall still go on praying; but my life now, my whole life apart from anything that can happen to me, every minute of it is no more meaningless, as it was before, but it has the positive meaning of goodness, which I have the power to put into it.”

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About James Steerforth

I am an author of poetry and fiction, translator and painter who loves to have fun with borrowed feathers.
This entry was posted in Film, Literature, Movies, Novel, Novel endings, Novelists, Writing. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Ending 16 – from a Russian novel published in 1873-1877

  1. suburbanlife says:

    Hi James 🙂 Anna Karenina by Tolstoy, i think this is – Kitty, Levin… G

  2. maryt says:

    Yes I think so, suburbanlife 🙂

  3. Yes, this is the ending of “Anna Karenina” by Tolstoy. Thank you, suburbanlife and maryt.

    Am I making things too easy? 🙂

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